Difference between revisions of "Support"

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(Created page with "= Is my mainboard supported? = There are several steps involved in finding out whether your mainboard is supported by coreboot, or if it would be easy to support. * First, chec...")
 
(Is my mainboard supported?)
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There are several steps involved in finding out whether your mainboard is supported by coreboot, or if it would be easy to support.
 
There are several steps involved in finding out whether your mainboard is supported by coreboot, or if it would be easy to support.
  
* First, check the [[Supported Motherboards]]. If your mainboard is not mentioned here, you will have to know how to code C in order to proceed.
+
* First, check the [[Supported Motherboards]]. If your mainboard is in this list, you are lucky and you will be able to try coreboot.
 +
* If your mainboard is not mentioned here, you will have to know how to code C in order to proceed. If you don't, refrain from trying to get coreboot onto your system.
 +
* Next, you will have to do a lot of data gathering:
 +
** Check out your mainboard's chipset. Use lspci on Linux/*BSD to do this. Look at the host bridge and at the LPC bridge. If you find those in our list of [[Supported Chipsets and Devices]] a port might be easy.
 +
** If your chipset is supported, check out the SuperIO with [[Superiotool]]
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** Look for a board that has the same chipset and the same SuperIO and start from there. Make sure you have a backup solution in place to recover if something goes wrong. You can not use your vendor bios' recovery bootblock to do this.

Revision as of 02:01, 14 January 2011

Is my mainboard supported?

There are several steps involved in finding out whether your mainboard is supported by coreboot, or if it would be easy to support.

  • First, check the Supported Motherboards. If your mainboard is in this list, you are lucky and you will be able to try coreboot.
  • If your mainboard is not mentioned here, you will have to know how to code C in order to proceed. If you don't, refrain from trying to get coreboot onto your system.
  • Next, you will have to do a lot of data gathering:
    • Check out your mainboard's chipset. Use lspci on Linux/*BSD to do this. Look at the host bridge and at the LPC bridge. If you find those in our list of Supported Chipsets and Devices a port might be easy.
    • If your chipset is supported, check out the SuperIO with Superiotool
    • Look for a board that has the same chipset and the same SuperIO and start from there. Make sure you have a backup solution in place to recover if something goes wrong. You can not use your vendor bios' recovery bootblock to do this.