<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 10/26/06, <b class="gmail_sendername">Tom Sylla</b> <<a href="mailto:tsylla@gmail.com">tsylla@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Please refer to Chapter 10 "Memory Cache Control" in the Intel manual<br>you mentioned. Find the Table called "Cache Operating Modes" (Table<br>10-5 in current version). The way it works is described well in that
<br>table. For CD=1, "Read hits access the cache; read misses do not cause<br>replacement." and "Write hits update the cache". So that means<br>anything that is a "hit" acts just like RAM. Nothing too fancy. You
<br>just have to make sure that the area you want to "hit" gets pre-loaded<br>before you turn the cache back off again.</blockquote><div><br>
<br>
Thanks  tom!<br>
this is the 'can you read carefully' test that I flunked. It is obvious once you read it, except I missed it for<br>
5 years :-) Once Eswar pointed it out it was obvious.<br>
<br>
ron<br>
</div><br></div><br>