<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 9:34 AM, Marc Jones <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:marcj303@gmail.com">marcj303@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 9:28 AM, Myles Watson<<a href="mailto:mylesgw@gmail.com">mylesgw@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
>> That seems like a defective card but something is strange. Why<br>
>> wouldn't it detect the functions when the first function was enabled?<br>
><br>
> It doesn't probe the other functions when the first function is enabled<br>
> because it is not a multi-function device.  It reads that from the config<br>
> space and skips to the next slot.<br>
<br>
</div>Ah, OK. Maybe we should make the scan a little smarter by checking the<br>
device capability and skip to the next device instead of next<br>
function.</blockquote><div><br>That would work in my situation.  I guess I was also asking what it means for a device to be disabled.  Does that mean that we don't touch it at all?  Should we read config space values from a disabled device?<br>
<br>Maybe it's too much of a corner case to worry about.  Disabling all 8 functions isn't too much of a pain.<br><br>Thanks,<br>Myles <br></div></div><br>