Difference between revisions of "GSoC"

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= Google Summer of Code 2007 =
+
coreboot is applying for [https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com/ Google Summer of Code 2017] as a mentoring organization.
 +
It is not assumed that we are accepted yet. We will announce this on the mailing list, chat.coreboot.org and update this page when we are informed on 27 February.
  
Welcome to the [http://code.google.com/soc/ Google Summer of Code(tm)] page of the [[Welcome to LinuxBIOS|LinuxBIOS project]].
+
coreboot has many [[Project Ideas]] for various ability levels. The coreboot project also acts as an umbrella organization for other open-source firmware related projects.
  
= Projects =
+
Official student application period in 2017 is from March 20 to April 3, with results announced on April 4.  For the complete timeline, please see the [https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com/how-it-works/#timeline GSoC 2017 timeline].
  
== Booting Windows and other Operating Systems in LinuxBIOS ==
+
__FORCETOC__
  
The goal of this sub project is to figure out how to boot Windows Vista/XP/2003. There are three approaches that might proof successful:
+
== coreboot contacts ==
  
* using a dedicated LinuxBIOS loader (ie. adapting [http://www.reactos.org/ ReactOS] FREELDR)
+
If you are interested in participating in GSoC as a student student, please visit [https://chat.coreboot.org/ chat.coreboot.org]. Working closely with the community is highly encouraged, as we've seen that our most successful students are generally very involved.
* booting Windows on top of Linux using [http://www.xmission.com/~ebiederm/files/kexec/README kexec]/[http://kboot.sourceforge.net/ kboot]
 
* fixing [[ADLO]] so that it boots Vista/XP and removing the mainboard dependencies in it's code.
 
  
 +
[[User:PatrickGeorgi|Patrick Georgi]] and [[User:MartinRoth|Martin Roth]] are the coreboot GSoC admins for 2017.  Please feel free to reach out to them directly if you have any questions.
  
== Port Grub2 to work in LinuxBIOS ==
+
= Why work on coreboot for GSoC 2017? =
  
Grub2 is going to be _the_ bootloader of choice in the forseeable future. As such, it could replace both Grub legacy and FILO, the LinuxBIOS hack for grub compatibility. FILO lacks many features that come with grub2 with no extra effort.
+
* coreboot offers you the opportunity to work with various architectures right on the iron. coreboot supports both current and older silicon for a wide variety of chips and technologies.
 +
* coreboot has a worldwide developer and user base.
 +
* We are a very passionate team, so you will interact directly with the project initiators and project leaders.
 +
* We have a large, helpful community. coreboot has some extremely talented and helpful experts in firmware involved in the project. They are ready to assist and mentor students participating in GSoC.
 +
* One of the last areas where open source software is not common is firmware. Running proprietary firmware can have severe effects on user's freedom and security. coreboot changes that by providing a common framework for initial hardware initialization and you can help us succeed.
  
This task splits into four sub-problems:
+
= GSoC Student requirements =
  
* Add a target i386-linuxbios, next to i386-pc and i386-efi to the configuration process
+
What will be required of you to be a coreboot GSoC student?
* Add an IDE driver that does direct access instead of intXX calls
 
* Make the build process generate a single static ELF image, like it is done on Sparc
 
* Add support for reading the memory size from the LinuxBIOS table.
 
  
 +
Google Summer of Code is a full-time job. This means we expect you to work roughly 40 hours per week on your project, during the three months of coding. Obviously we have flexibility, but if your schedule (exams, courses, other obligations) does not give you this amount of time, then you should not apply. We expect to be able to see this level of effort in student output.
  
== SCSI booting in LinuxBIOS ==
+
== Before applying ==
 +
*Prior to project acceptance, you have demonstrated that you can work with the coreboot codebase.
 +
:*By the time you have submitted your application, you should have downloaded, built and booted coreboot in QEMU, SimNow, or on real hardware. Please email your serial output results to the mailing list.
 +
:*Look over some of the development processes guidelines: [[git]], [https://review.coreboot.org/cgit/coreboot.git/plain/Documentation/gerrit_guidelines.md? Gerrit Etiquette and Guidelines], [[Development Guidelines]], and [[Developer Manual]]
 +
:*Get signed up for gerrit and push at least one patch to Gerrit for review. Check [[Easy projects]] or ask for simple tasks on the mailing list or on chat.coreboot.org if you need ideas.
 +
:*Look through some patches on gerrit to get an understanding of the review process and common issues
 +
*Before applying, you should also join the [https://www.coreboot.org/mailman/listinfo/coreboot mailing list] and [https://chat.coreboot.org chat.coreboot.org]. Introduce yourself and mention that you are a prospective GSoC student. Ask questions and discuss the project that you are considering. Community involvement is a key component of coreboot development.
  
Currently LinuxBIOS can not boot from an arbitrary SCSI controller. There are two solutions for the problem:
+
== During the program ==
* Use Linux and Kexec. This requires to keep the SCSI driver in the flash chip.
+
* To pass and to be paid by Google requires that you meet certain milestones.
* Use x86emu/vm86/[[ADLO]] and the int13 method. This would allow to use the PCI option rom available on all modern SCSI controllers.
+
:* First, you must be in good standing with the community before the official start of the program. We expect you to post some design emails to the mailing list, and get feedback on them, both before applying, and during the "community bonding period" between acceptance and official start.
 +
:* You must have made progress and committed significant code before the mid-term point and by the final.
 +
:* We require that accepted students to maintain a blog, where you are expected to write about your project *WEEKLY*. This is a way to measure progress and for the community at large to be able to help you. GSoC is *NOT* a private contract between your mentor and you. [https://blogs.coreboot.org/ blogs.coreboot.org]
 +
* Student must be active in the community on chat.coreboot.org and the mailing list.
 +
* Students are expected to work on development publicly, and to push commits to the project on a regular basis. Depending on the project and what your mentor agrees to, these can be published directly to the project or to a public repository such as gitlab or github. If you are not publishing directly to the project codebase, be aware that we do not want large dumps of code that need to be rushed to meet the mid-term and final goals.
  
So we obviously need a solution based on the later. This could as well be implemented as a Linux program, as an intermediate payload, or as a shared library.
+
We don't expect our students to be experts in our problem domain, but we don't want you to fail because some basic misunderstanding was in your way of completing the task.
 
 
The code you are going to write needs to catch the int13 interrupt vector that the SCSI option rom installs and make it available to arbitrary (firmware/payload) code trying to load something from disk. This
 
 
 
This is a LinuxBIOSv3 project.
 
 
 
 
 
== CMOS Config / Device Tree Browser Payload ==
 
 
 
Unlike other BIOSes, Linux has no such thing as a "CMOS setup". This does not mean that you can not configure it. There is a nice and small Linux command line utility called [http://lxbios.sf.net lxbios] for that purpose. But people are often asking for a builtin config tool. Such a config tool could feature VGA graphics (maybe even VESA?), it should be easy to use, allow to browse information from LinuxBIOS' central structure: the device tree, and provide lxbios functionality with some sex appeal.
 
 
 
This is a LinuxBIOSv3 project.
 
  
 +
= Projects =
  
== LinuxBIOS graphical port creator ==
+
There are many development tasks available in coreboot. Please visit the following pages for some ideas or come up with your own idea.
 +
* [[Project Ideas|coreboot project ideas]]
 +
<!-- * [https://www.flashrom.org/GSoC flashrom project ideas] -->
 +
* [https://serialice.com/GSoC SerialICE project ideas]
  
In LinuxBIOSv2, every port to a new mainboard requires that you touch a lot of source files with only minimal changes. In version 3 we try to fix this issue and pack all mainboard specific information into a configuration file that we call the Device Tree Source (DTS).  
+
We keep a list of [[previous GSoC Projects]] which might be of interest to you to see what others have accomplished.
This Device Tree config file is a simple text file describing what static (non-detectable and/or soldered on) devices are used on the mainbard and how they are wired (SPD-ROM, Interrupt Routing, SuperIO, Northbridge, Southbridge, Hypertransport,..). It is mostly organized as a tree (with some special cases, Hypertransport allows cycles for instance)
+
Similarly the [https://blogs.coreboot.org/blog/category/gsoc/ blog posts related to previous GSoC projects] might give some insights to what it is like to be a coreboot GSoC student.
  
The idea is to create a tool, based on the [www.eclipse.org/ Eclipse IDE], Swing, or your favourite portable toolkit, which allows you to drag and drop those components together and describe how they are wired.
+
== Your own Project Ideas ==
  
This would be a great help for mainboard vendors that build mainboards of already supported components. No more reading of LinuxBIOS code would be required, but rather only the understanding of the hardware, and probably the mainboard schematics.
+
We have come up with some ideas for cool Summer of Code projects. These are projects that we think can be managed in the short period of GSoC, and they cover areas where coreboot is trying to reach new users and new use cases.
  
This is a LinuxBIOSv3 project. It requires good Java and/or Eclipse skills (or whatever toolkit/language you choose)
+
Of course your application does not need to be based on any of the ideas listed. The opposite: Maybe you have a great idea that we just didn't think of yet. Please let us know!
  
== Open Firmware payload for LinuxBIOS ==
+
= coreboot Summer of Code Application =
  
Mitch Bradley from [http://www.firmworks.com/ Firmworks, Inc.] released the [http://www.openbios.org/OpenFirmware Open Firmware sources] under a BSD license. The released code does work in LinuxBIOS, but could use some proper integration and testing on some hardware or in [http://fabrice.bellard.free.fr/qemu/ Qemu].  
+
coreboot welcomes students from all backgrounds and levels of experience.  
  
This project might benefit from some Forth skills, but I don't think they are required.
+
Your application should include a complete project proposal. You should document that you have the knowledge and the ability to complete your proposed project. This may require a little research and understanding of coreboot prior to sending your application. The community and coreboot project mentors are your best resource in fleshing out your project ideas and helping with a project timeline. We recommend that you get feedback and recommendations on your proposal before the application deadline.
  
 +
Please complete the standard Google SoC application and project proposal. Prospective coreboot GSoC student should provide the following information as part of their application. If you are applying for a flashrom or SerialICE project use common sense when using the template below, this is part of the test. ;)
  
== GNUFI or TianoCore payloads ==
+
=== Personal Information ===
 +
:Name:
 +
:Email:
 +
:Phone number:
 +
:chat/IM/IRC/Skype/other contact:
 +
:Country/Timezone:
 +
:Normal working hours(UTC):
 +
:School:
 +
:Degree Program:
 +
:Expected graduation date:
 +
:Short bio / overview of your background:
 +
:What are your other time commitments? Do you have a job, classes, vacations? When and how long?
  
There are two open source EFI implementations out there. [http://gnufi.blogspot.com/ GNUFI] (or [http://www.hermann-uwe.de/blog/gnufi-the-gnu-firmware-implementation here] or [http://www.gnu.org/software/gnufi/ here]) and [http://www.tianocore.org/ TianoCore]. Try getting those to work as LinuxBIOS payloads, or change LinuxBIOS so it can load them as payloads.
+
=== Software experience ===
 +
:Github / Web Page / Blog / Microblog / Portfolio:
 +
:Links to one or more patches submitted to the project you're applying for:
 +
:Links to posts on the mailing list with the serial output of your build: [https://www.coreboot.org/pipermail/coreboot/ Mailing List Archives]
 +
:Please comment on your software and firmware experience.
 +
:Have you contributed to an open source project? Which one? What was your experience?
 +
:Did you build and run coreboot? Did you have problems?
  
This project requires no hardware skills, but especially in case of TianoCore might require knowledge of Windows compilers (VC2005?)
+
=== Your project ===
 +
: Please provide an overview of your project (in your own words).
 +
:: Provide break down of your project in small specific weekly goals. Think about the potential timeline.
 +
:: How will you accomplish this goal? What is your working style?
 +
:: Explain what risks or potential problems your project might experience.
 +
:: What would you expect as a minimum level of success?
 +
:: Do you have a stretch goal?
  
= Your own Projects =
+
=== Other ===
 +
:Resume (optional):
  
We've listed some ideas for projects here, but we're more than happy to entertain other ideas if you've got any.
+
== Advice on how to apply ==
Feel free to contact us under the address below, and don't hesitate to suggest whatever you have in mind.
+
* The Drupal project has a great page on [https://www.drupal.org/node/59037 how to write an SOC application].
 +
* GSoC Student Guide: [http://en.flossmanuals.net/GSoCStudentGuide/]
 +
* Secrets for GSoC success: [http://softwareswirl.blogspot.com/2014/03/my-secret-tip-for-gsoc-success.html]
  
= Summer of Code 2007 Application =
+
= Mentors =
  
Please complete the standard [http://code.google.com/soc/ Google SoC 2007 application]. Additionally, please provide information on the following:
+
Each accepted project will have a lead mentor and a backup mentor. We will match mentors and students based on the project, experience level, and geographic location (native language, culture and time zone).
  
# Who are you? What are you studying?
+
Summer of Code primary mentors, are expected to stay in frequent contact with the student and provide guidance such as code reviews, pointers to useful documentation, etc. This should generally be a time commitment of one to two hours a week.
# Why are you the right person for this task?
 
# Do you have any other commitments that we should know about?
 
# List your C, Assembler or Java experience. (Depending on the project)
 
# List your history with open source projects.
 
# What is your preferred method of contact? (Phone, email, Skype, etc)
 
  
Feel free to keep your application short. A 15 page essay is no better than a 2 page summary. If you wish to write 15 pages, you are of course welcome to do so, and we will gladly put your paper up on the web page. But it is not required for the application.
+
Backup mentors are expected to coordinate with the primary mentor and student on a regular basis, and keep track of the student process.  They should be work with the primary mentor and be available to take over mentoring duty if the primary mentor is unavailable (vacations, sickness, emergencies).
  
The Drupal project has a great page on [http://drupal.org/node/59037 How to write an SOC application].
+
== Volunteering to be a mentor ==
  
= Contact =
+
If you'd like to volunteer to be a mentor, please read the [https://developers.google.com/open-source/gsoc/resources/manual#mentor_manual GSoC Mentor Manual].  This will give you a better idea of expectations, and where to go for help.
 +
After that, contact Martin or Patrick and let them know that you're interested.
  
If you are interested in becoming a GSoC student, please contact [mailto:stepan@coresystems.de Stefan Reinauer].
+
The following coreboot developers have volunteered to be GSoC 2017 mentors. Please stop by [https://chat.coreboot.org chat.coreboot.org] and say hi to them and ask them questions.
  
There is also an IRC channel on irc.freenode.net: #LinuxBIOS (actually a forwarder to #OpenBIOS because it is the same folks hanging out there.)
+
{| class="wikitable"
 +
|-
 +
! Name !! Role !! Comms !! AFK / Vacation MMDD-MMDD
 +
|-
 +
| [[User:MartinRoth|Martin Roth]] || coreboot: co-organizer and mentor || chat: martinr Email: gaumless@gmail.com|| No dates yet
 +
|-
 +
| [[User:PatrickGeorgi|Patrick Georgi]] || coreboot: co-organizer and mentor || chat: patrickg, pgeorgi ||
 +
|-
 +
| [[User:Stepan|Stefan Reinauer]] || coreboot/serialice:  mentor  || chat: stepan ||
 +
|-
 +
| [[User:Rminnich|Ron Minnich]] || coreboot: mentor || chat: rminnich ||
 +
|-
 +
|}

Latest revision as of 10:05, 21 January 2017

coreboot is applying for Google Summer of Code 2017 as a mentoring organization. It is not assumed that we are accepted yet. We will announce this on the mailing list, chat.coreboot.org and update this page when we are informed on 27 February.

coreboot has many Project Ideas for various ability levels. The coreboot project also acts as an umbrella organization for other open-source firmware related projects.

Official student application period in 2017 is from March 20 to April 3, with results announced on April 4. For the complete timeline, please see the GSoC 2017 timeline.


coreboot contacts

If you are interested in participating in GSoC as a student student, please visit chat.coreboot.org. Working closely with the community is highly encouraged, as we've seen that our most successful students are generally very involved.

Patrick Georgi and Martin Roth are the coreboot GSoC admins for 2017. Please feel free to reach out to them directly if you have any questions.

Why work on coreboot for GSoC 2017?

  • coreboot offers you the opportunity to work with various architectures right on the iron. coreboot supports both current and older silicon for a wide variety of chips and technologies.
  • coreboot has a worldwide developer and user base.
  • We are a very passionate team, so you will interact directly with the project initiators and project leaders.
  • We have a large, helpful community. coreboot has some extremely talented and helpful experts in firmware involved in the project. They are ready to assist and mentor students participating in GSoC.
  • One of the last areas where open source software is not common is firmware. Running proprietary firmware can have severe effects on user's freedom and security. coreboot changes that by providing a common framework for initial hardware initialization and you can help us succeed.

GSoC Student requirements

What will be required of you to be a coreboot GSoC student?

Google Summer of Code is a full-time job. This means we expect you to work roughly 40 hours per week on your project, during the three months of coding. Obviously we have flexibility, but if your schedule (exams, courses, other obligations) does not give you this amount of time, then you should not apply. We expect to be able to see this level of effort in student output.

Before applying

  • Prior to project acceptance, you have demonstrated that you can work with the coreboot codebase.
  • By the time you have submitted your application, you should have downloaded, built and booted coreboot in QEMU, SimNow, or on real hardware. Please email your serial output results to the mailing list.
  • Look over some of the development processes guidelines: git, Gerrit Etiquette and Guidelines, Development Guidelines, and Developer Manual
  • Get signed up for gerrit and push at least one patch to Gerrit for review. Check Easy projects or ask for simple tasks on the mailing list or on chat.coreboot.org if you need ideas.
  • Look through some patches on gerrit to get an understanding of the review process and common issues
  • Before applying, you should also join the mailing list and chat.coreboot.org. Introduce yourself and mention that you are a prospective GSoC student. Ask questions and discuss the project that you are considering. Community involvement is a key component of coreboot development.

During the program

  • To pass and to be paid by Google requires that you meet certain milestones.
  • First, you must be in good standing with the community before the official start of the program. We expect you to post some design emails to the mailing list, and get feedback on them, both before applying, and during the "community bonding period" between acceptance and official start.
  • You must have made progress and committed significant code before the mid-term point and by the final.
  • We require that accepted students to maintain a blog, where you are expected to write about your project *WEEKLY*. This is a way to measure progress and for the community at large to be able to help you. GSoC is *NOT* a private contract between your mentor and you. blogs.coreboot.org
  • Student must be active in the community on chat.coreboot.org and the mailing list.
  • Students are expected to work on development publicly, and to push commits to the project on a regular basis. Depending on the project and what your mentor agrees to, these can be published directly to the project or to a public repository such as gitlab or github. If you are not publishing directly to the project codebase, be aware that we do not want large dumps of code that need to be rushed to meet the mid-term and final goals.

We don't expect our students to be experts in our problem domain, but we don't want you to fail because some basic misunderstanding was in your way of completing the task.

Projects

There are many development tasks available in coreboot. Please visit the following pages for some ideas or come up with your own idea.

We keep a list of previous GSoC Projects which might be of interest to you to see what others have accomplished. Similarly the blog posts related to previous GSoC projects might give some insights to what it is like to be a coreboot GSoC student.

Your own Project Ideas

We have come up with some ideas for cool Summer of Code projects. These are projects that we think can be managed in the short period of GSoC, and they cover areas where coreboot is trying to reach new users and new use cases.

Of course your application does not need to be based on any of the ideas listed. The opposite: Maybe you have a great idea that we just didn't think of yet. Please let us know!

coreboot Summer of Code Application

coreboot welcomes students from all backgrounds and levels of experience.

Your application should include a complete project proposal. You should document that you have the knowledge and the ability to complete your proposed project. This may require a little research and understanding of coreboot prior to sending your application. The community and coreboot project mentors are your best resource in fleshing out your project ideas and helping with a project timeline. We recommend that you get feedback and recommendations on your proposal before the application deadline.

Please complete the standard Google SoC application and project proposal. Prospective coreboot GSoC student should provide the following information as part of their application. If you are applying for a flashrom or SerialICE project use common sense when using the template below, this is part of the test. ;)

Personal Information

Name:
Email:
Phone number:
chat/IM/IRC/Skype/other contact:
Country/Timezone:
Normal working hours(UTC):
School:
Degree Program:
Expected graduation date:
Short bio / overview of your background:
What are your other time commitments? Do you have a job, classes, vacations? When and how long?

Software experience

Github / Web Page / Blog / Microblog / Portfolio:
Links to one or more patches submitted to the project you're applying for:
Links to posts on the mailing list with the serial output of your build: Mailing List Archives
Please comment on your software and firmware experience.
Have you contributed to an open source project? Which one? What was your experience?
Did you build and run coreboot? Did you have problems?

Your project

Please provide an overview of your project (in your own words).
Provide break down of your project in small specific weekly goals. Think about the potential timeline.
How will you accomplish this goal? What is your working style?
Explain what risks or potential problems your project might experience.
What would you expect as a minimum level of success?
Do you have a stretch goal?

Other

Resume (optional):

Advice on how to apply

Mentors

Each accepted project will have a lead mentor and a backup mentor. We will match mentors and students based on the project, experience level, and geographic location (native language, culture and time zone).

Summer of Code primary mentors, are expected to stay in frequent contact with the student and provide guidance such as code reviews, pointers to useful documentation, etc. This should generally be a time commitment of one to two hours a week.

Backup mentors are expected to coordinate with the primary mentor and student on a regular basis, and keep track of the student process. They should be work with the primary mentor and be available to take over mentoring duty if the primary mentor is unavailable (vacations, sickness, emergencies).

Volunteering to be a mentor

If you'd like to volunteer to be a mentor, please read the GSoC Mentor Manual. This will give you a better idea of expectations, and where to go for help. After that, contact Martin or Patrick and let them know that you're interested.

The following coreboot developers have volunteered to be GSoC 2017 mentors. Please stop by chat.coreboot.org and say hi to them and ask them questions.

Name Role Comms AFK / Vacation MMDD-MMDD
Martin Roth coreboot: co-organizer and mentor chat: martinr Email: gaumless@gmail.com No dates yet
Patrick Georgi coreboot: co-organizer and mentor chat: patrickg, pgeorgi
Stefan Reinauer coreboot/serialice: mentor chat: stepan
Ron Minnich coreboot: mentor chat: rminnich